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    Around the World, It’s a Persistent Memory Summer

    June 19th, 2017
    This summer, join SNIA as they evangelize members’ industry activity to advance the convergence of storage and memory. SNIA is participating in the first annual European In-Memory Computing Summit, June 20-21, 2017 at the Movenpick Hotel in Amsterdam.  SNIA Europe Vice-Chair and SNIA Solid State Storage Initiative (SSSI) Co-Chair Alex McDonald of NetApp keynotes a session on SNIA and Persistent Memory, highlighting SNIA work on an NVM programming model and persistent memory solutions available today and SNIA is a sponsor in the exhibit hall.  Continue Reading...

    Your Questions Answered on Non-Volatile DIMMs

    April 3rd, 2017
      by Arthur Sainio, SNIA NVDIMM SIG Co-Chair, SMART Modular SNIA’s Non-Volatile DIMM (NVDIMM) Special Interest Group (SIG) had a tremendous response to their most recent webcast:  NVDIMM:  Applications are Here!  You can view the webcast on demand. Viewers had many questions during the webcast.  In this blog, the NVDIMM SIG answers those questions and shares the SIG’s knowledge of NVDIMM technology. Have a question?  Send it to nvdimmsigchair@snia.org. 1. What about 3DXpoint, how will this technology impact the market?  Continue Reading...

    How Many IOPS? Users Share Their 2017 Storage Performance Needs

    March 24th, 2017
    New on the Solid State Storage website is a whitepaper from analysts Tom Coughlin of Coughlin Associates and Jim Handy of Objective Analysis which details what IT manager requirements are for storage performance. The paper examines how requirements have changed over a four-year period for a range of applications, including databases, online transaction processing, cloud and storage services, and scientific and engineering computing.   Continue Reading...

    Cast Your Vote on November 8 for the Magic and Mystery of In-Memory Apps!

    November 2nd, 2016

    It’s an easy “Yes” vote for this great webcast from the SNIA Solid State Storage Initiative on the Magic and Mystery of In-Memory Apps! Join us on Election Day – November 8 – at 1:00 pm ET/10:00 am PT to learn about today’s market and the disruptions that happen when combining big-data vote-yes(Petabytes) with in-memory/real-time requirements.  You’ll understand the interactions with Hadoop/Spark, Tachyon, SAP HANA, NoSQL, and the related infrastructure of DRAM, NAND, 3DXpoint, NV-DIMMs, and high-speed networking and learn what happens to infrastructure design and operations when “tiered-memory” replaces “tiered storage”.

    Presenter Shaun Walsh of G2M Communications is an expert in memory technology – and a great speaker! He’ll share with you what you need to know about evaluating, planning, and implementing in-memory computing applications, and give you the framework to evaluation and plan for your adoption of in-memory computing.

    Register at: https://www.brighttalk.com/webcast/663/230103


    SNIA Puts the You in YouTube

    October 26th, 2016

    Did you know that SNIA has a YouTube Channel?  SNIAVideo is the place designed for You to visit for the latest technical and educational content – all free to download – from SNIA thought leaders and events. youtube channel

    Our latest videos cover a wide range of topics discussed at last month’s SNIA Storage Developer Conference.  Enjoy The Ride Cast video playlist where industry expert Marc Farley (@GoFarley) motors around Silicon Valley with SNIA member volunteers Richelle Ahlvers(@rahlvers), Stephen Bates (@stepbates), Mark Carlson(@macsun), and storage and solid state technology analysts Tom Coughlin (@ThomasaCoughlin), and Jim Handy chatting about persistent memory, SNIA Swordfish, NVMe, storage end users, and more.  You’ll also want to check out onsite interviews from Kinetic open storage project participants Seagate, Scality, and Open vStorage on their experiences at an SDC solutions plugfest.

    Featured on the SNIAVideo YouTube Channel are SNIA thought leaders weighing in on the trends and activities that will revolutionize enterprise data centers and consumer applications over the next decade.  New ways to unify the management of storage and servers in hyperscale and cloud environments; an ecosystem driving system memory and storage into a single, unified “persistent memory” entity; and how security is being managed at enterprises today are just a few of the topics covered by speakers from Microsoft, Intel, Toshiba, Cryptsoft, and more.

    you tube channel pictureBookmark our site and return often for fresh, new content on how SNIA helps You understand and solve the thorny storage issues facing your career and your organization.


    SNIA Storage Developer Conference-The Knowledge Continues

    October 13th, 2016

    SNIA’s 18th Storage Developer Conference is officially a success, with 124 general and breakout sessions;  Cloud Interoperability, Kinetiplugfest 5c Storage, and SMB3 plugfests; ten Birds-of-a-Feather Sessions, and amazing networking among 450+ attendees.  Sessions on NVMe over Fabrics won the title of most attended, but Persistent Memory, Object Storage, and Performance were right behind.  Many thanks to SDC 2016 Sponsors, who engaged attendees in exciting technology discussions.

    For those not familiar with SDC, this technical industry event is designed for a variety of storage technologists at various levels from developers to architects to product managers and more.  And, true to SNIA’s commitment to educating the industry on current and future disruptive technologies, SDC content is now available to all – whether you attended or not – for download and viewing.

    20160919_120059You’ll want to stream keynotes from Citigroup, Toshiba, DSSD, Los Alamos National Labs, Broadcom, Microsemi, and Intel – they’re available now on demand on SNIA’s YouTube channel, SNIAVideo.

    All SDC presentations are now available for download; and over the next few months, you can continue to download SDC podcasts which combine audio and slides. The first podcast from SDC 2016 – on hyperscaler (as well as all 2015 SDC Podcasts) are available here, and more will be available in the coming weeks.

    SNIA thanks all its members and colleagues who contributed to make SDC a success! A special thanks goes out to the SNIA Technical Council, a select group of acknowledged industry experts who work to guide SNIA technical efforts. In addition to driving the agenda and content for SDC, the Technical Council oversees and manages SNIA Technical Work Groups, reviews architectures submitted by Work Groups, and is the SNIA’s technical liaison to standards organizations. Learn more about these visionary leaders at http://www.snia.org/about/organization/tech_council.

    And finally, don’t forget to mark your calendars now for SDC 2017 – September 11-14, 2017, again at the Hyatt Regency Santa Clara. Watch for the Call for Presentations to open in February 2017.


    Flash Memory Summit Highlights SNIA Innovations in Persistent Memory & Flash

    July 28th, 2016

    SNIA and the Solid State Storage Initiative (SSSI) invite you to join them at Flash Memory Summit 2016, August 8-11 at the Santa Clara Convention Center. SNIA members and colleagues receive $100 off any conference package using the code “SNIA16” by August 4 when registering for Flash Memory Summit at fms boothhttp://www.flashmemorysummit.com

    On Monday, August 8, from 1:00pm – 5:00pm, a SNIA Education Afternoon will be open to the public in SCCC Room 203/204, where attendees can learn about multiple storage-related topics with five SNIA Tutorials on flash storage, combined service infrastructures, VDBench, stored-data encryption, and Non-Volatile DIMM (NVDIMM) integration from SNIA member speakers.

    Following the Education Afternoon, the SSSI will host a reception and networking event in SCCC Room 203/204 from 5:30 pm – 7:00 pm with SSSI leadership providing perspectives on the persistent memory and SSD markets, SSD performance, NVDIMM, SSD data recovery/erase, and interface technology. Attendees will also be entered into a drawing to win solid state drives.

    SNIA and SSSI members will also be featured during the conference in the following sessions:

    arthur crop

    • Persistent Memory (Preconference Session C)
      NVDIMM presentation by Arthur Sainio, SNIA NVDIMM SIG Co-Chair (SMART Modular)
      Monday, August 8, 8:30am- 12:00 noon 
    • Data Recovery of SSDs (Session 102-A)
      SIG activity discussion by Scott Holewinski, SSSI Data Recovery/Erase SIG Chair (Gillware)
      Tuesday, August 9, 9:45 am – 10:50 am
    • Persistent Memory – Beyond Flash sponsored by the SNIA SSSI (Forum R-21) Chairperson: Jim Pappas, SNIA Board of Directors Vice-Chair/SSSI Co-Chair (Intel); papers presented by SNIA members Rob Peglar (Symbolic IO), Rob Davis (Mellanox), Ken Gibson (Intel), Doug Voigt (HP), Neal Christensen (Microsoft) Wednesday, August 10, 8:30 am – 11:00 am
    • NVDIMM Panel, organized by the SNIA NVDIMM SIG (Session 301-B) Chairperson: Jeff Chang SNIA NVDIMM SIG Co-Chair (AgigA Tech); papers presented by SNIA members Alex Fuqa (HP), Neal Christensen (Microsoft) Thursday, August 11, 8:30am – 9:45am

    Finally, don’t miss the SNIA SSSI in Expo booth #820 in Hall B and in the Solutions Showcase in Hall C on the FMS Exhibit Floor. Attendees can review a series of updated performance statistics on NVDIMM and SSD, see live NVDIMM demonstrations, access SSD data recovery/erase education, and preview a new white paper discussing erasure with regard to SSDs. SNIA representatives will also be present to discuss other SNIA programs such as certification, conformance testing, membership, and conferences.


    Your Questions Answered on NVDIMM

    May 23rd, 2016

    The recent NVDIMM webcasts on the SNIA BrightTALK Channel sparked many questions from the almost 1,000 viewers who have watched it live or downloaded the on-demand cast. Now,  NVDIMM SIG Chairs Arthurnvdimm blog Sainio and Jeff Chang answer 35 of them in this blog.  Did you miss the live broadcasts? No worries, you can view NVDIMM and other webcasts on the SNIA webcast channel https://www.brighttalk.com/channel/663/snia-webcasts.

    FUTURES QUESTIONS

    What timeframe do you see server hardware, OS, and applications readily adopting/supporting/recognizing NVDIMMs?

    DDR4 server and storage platforms are ready now. There are many off-the shelf server and/or storage motherboards that support NVDIMM-N.

    Linux version 4.2 and beyond has native support for NVDIMMs. All the necessary drivers are supported in the OS.

    NVDIMM adoption is in progress now.

    Technical Preview 5 of Windows Server 2016 has NVDIMM-N support
     

    How, if at all, does the positioning of NVDIMM-F change after the eventual introduction of new NVM technologies?

    If 3DXP is successful it will likely to have a big impact on NVDIMM-F. 3DXP could be seen as an advanced version of a NVDIMM-F product. It sits directly on the DDR4 bus and is byte addressable.

    NVDIMM-F products have the challenge of making them BYTE ADDRESSBLE, depending on what kind of persistent media is used.

    If NAND flash is used, it would take a lot of techniques and resources to make such a product BYTE ADDRESSABLE.

    On the other hand, if the new NVM technologies bring out persistent media that are BYTE ADDRESSABLE then the NVDIMM-F could easily use them for their backend.
    How does NVDIMM-N compare to Intel’s 3DXPoint technology?

    At this point there is limited technical information available on 3DXP devices.

    When the specifications become available the NVDIMM SIG can create a comparison table.

    NVDIMM-N products are available now. 3DXP-based products are planned for 2017, 2018. Theoretically 3DXP devices could be used on NVDIMM-N type modules

     

     

     

    PERFORMANCE AND ENDURANCE QUESTIONS

    What are the NVDIMM performance and endurance requirements?

    NVDIMM-N is no different from a RDIMM under normal operating conditions. The endurance of the Flash or NVM technology used on the NVDIMM-N is not a critical factor since it is only used for backup.

    NVDIMM-F would depend on various factors: (1) is the backend going to be NAND Flash or some other entity? (2) What kind of access pattern is going to be done by the application? The performance must be at least same as that of NVDIMM-N.

    Are there endurance requirements for NVDIMM-F? Won’t the flash wear out quickly when used as memory?

    Yes, the aspect of Flash being used as a RANDOM access device with MEMORY access characteristics would definitely have an impact on the endurance.
    NVDIMM-F – Doesn’t the performance limitations of the NAND vs. DRAM effect the application?

    NAND Flash would never hit the performance requirements of the DRAM when seen as an entity to entity comparison. But, in the whole perspective of a wider solution, the data path of DRAM data -> Persistence Data in a traditional model would have more delays contributed by a good number of software layers involved in making the data persistent versus, in the NVDIMM-F the data that is instantly persistent — for just a short term additional latency.
    Is there extra heat being generated….does it need any other cooling (NVDIMM-F, NVDIMM-N)

    No
    In general, our testing of NVDIMM-F vs PCIe based SSDs has not shown the expected value of NVDIMMs.  The PCIe based NVMe storage still outperforms the NVDIMMs.

    TBD
    What is the amount of overhead that NVDIMMs are adding on CPUs?

    None at normal operation
    What can you say about the time required typically to charge the supercaps?  Is the application aware of that status before charge is complete?

    Approximately two minutes depending on the density of the NVDIMM and the vendor.

    The NVDIMM will not be ready because the charging status and in turn the system BIOS will wait; until it times out if the NVDIMM is not functioning.

    USE QUESTIONS

    What will happen if a system crashes then comes back before the NVDIMM finishes backup? How the OS know what to continue as the state in the register/L1/L2/L3 cache is already lost?

    When system comes back up, it will check if there is valid data backed up in the NVDIMM. If yes, backed up data will be restored first before the BIOS sets up the system.

    The OS can’t depend on the contents of the L1/L2/L3 cache. Applications must do I/O fencing, use commit points, etc. to guarantee data consistency.

    Power supply should be able to hold power for at least 1ms after the warning of AC power loss.

    Is there garbage collection on NVDIMMs?

    This depends on individual vendors. NVDIMM-N may have overprovisioning and wear levering management for the NAND Flash.

    Garbage collection really only makes sense for NVDIMM-F.
    How is byte addressing enabled for NAND storage?

    By default, the NAND storage can be addressed only through the BLOCK mode addressing. If BYTE addressability is desired, then the DDR memory at the front must provide sophisticated CACHING TECHNIQUES to trick the Host Memory Controller in to thinking that it is actually accessing a larger capacity DDR memory.
    Is the restore command issued over the I2C bus?  Is that also known as the SMBus?

    Yes, Yes
    Could NVDIMM-F products be used as both storage and memory within the same server?

    NVDIMM-F is by definition only block storage. NVDIMM-P is both (block) storage and memory.

     

    COMPATIBILITY QUESTIONS

     

    Is NVDIMM-N support built into the OS or do the NVDIMM vendors need to provide drivers? What OS’s (Windows version, Linux kernel version) have support?

    In Linux, right from 4.2 version of the Kernel, the generic NVDIMM-N support is available.

    All the necessary drivers are provided in the OS itself.

    Regarding the Linux distributions, only Fedora and Ubuntu have upgraded themselves to the 4.x kernel.

    The crucial aspect is, the BIOS/MRC support needed for the vendor specific NVDIMM-N to get exposed to the Host OS.

    MS Windows has OS support – need to download.
    What OS support is available for NVDIMM-F? I’m assuming some sort of drivers is required.

    Diablo has said they worked the BIOS vendors to enable their Memory1 product. We need to check with them.

    For other NVDIMM-F vendors they would likely require drivers.

    As of now no native OS support is available.
    Will NVDIMMs work with typical Intel servers that are 2-3 years old?   What are the hardware requirements?

    The depends on the CPU. For Haswell, Grantley, Broadwell, and Purley the NVDIMM-N are and/or will be supported

    The hardware requires that the CPLD, SAVE, and ADR signals are present

    Is RDMA compatible with NVDIMM-F or NVDIMM-N?

    The RDMA (Remote Direct Memory Access) is not available by default for NVDIMM-N and NVDIMM-F.

    A software layer/extension needs to be written to accommodate that. Works are in progress by the PMEM committee (www.pmem.io) to make the RDMA feature available transparently for the applications in the future.

    SNIA Reference: http://www.snia.org/sites/default/files/SDC15_presentations/persistant_mem/ChetDouglas_RDMA_with_PM.pdf
    What’s the highest capacity that an NVDIMM-N can support?

    Currently 8GB and 16GB but this depends on individual vendor’s roadmaps.

     

    COST QUESTIONS

    What is the NVDIMM cost going to look like compared to other flash type storage options?

    This relates directly to what types and quantizes of Flash, DRAM, controllers and other components are used for each type.

     

    MISCELLANEOUS QUESTIONS

    How many vendors offer NVDIMM products?

    AgigA Tech, Diablo, Hynix, Micron, Netlist, PNY, SMART, and Viking Technology are among the vendors offering NVDIMM products today.

     

    Is encryption on the NVDIMM handled by the controller on the NVDIMM or the OS?

    Encryption on the NVDIMM is under discussion at JEDEC. There has been no standard encryption method adopted yet.

    If the OS encrypts data in memory the contents of the NVDIMM backup would be encrypted eliminating the need for the NVDIMM to perform encryption. Although because of the performance penalty of OS encryption, NVDIMM encryption is being considered by NVDIMM vendors.
    Are memory operations what is known as DAX?

    DAX means Direct Access and is the optimization used in the modern file systems – particularly EXT4 – to eliminate the Kernel Cache for holding the write data. With no intermediate cache buffers, the write operations go directly to the media. This makes the writes persistent as soon as they are committed.

    Can you give some practical examples of where you would use NVDIMM-N, -F, and –P?

    NVDIMM-N: load/store byte access for journaling, tiering, caching, write buffering and metadata storage

    NVDIMM-F: block access for in-memory database (moving NAND to the memory channel eliminates traditional HDD/SSD SAS/PCIe link transfer, driver, and software overhead)

    NVDIMM-P: can be used either NVDIMM-N or –F applications
    Are reads and writes all the same latency for NVDIMM-F?

    The answer depends on what kind of persistent layer is used.   If it is the NAND flash, then the random writes would have higher latencies when compared to the reads. If the 3D XPoint kind of persistent layer is used, it might not be that big of a difference.

     

    I have interest in the NVDIMMs being used as a replacement for SSD and concerns about clearing cache (including credentials) stored as data moves from NVM to PM on an end user device

    The NVDIMM-N uses serialization and fencing with Intel instructions to guarantee data is in the NVDIMM before a power failure and ADR.

     

    I am interested in how many banks of NVDIMMs can be added to create a very large SSD replacement in a server storage environment.

    NVDIMMs are added to a system in memory module slots. The current maximum density is 16GB or 32GB. Server motherboards may have 16 or 24 slots. If 8 of these slots have 16GB NVDIMMs that should be like a 96GB SSD.
    What are the environmental requirements for NVDIMMs (power, cooling, etc.)?

    There are some components on NVDIMMs that have a lower operating temperature than RDIMMs like flash and FPGA devices. Refer to each vendor’s data sheet for more information. Backup Energy Sources based on ultracapacitors require health monitoring and a controlled thermal environment to ensure an extended product life.
    How about data-at-rest protection management? Is the data in NVDIMM protected/encrypted? Complying with TCG and FIPS seems very challenging. What are the plans to align with these?

    As of today, encryption has not been standardized by JEDEC. It is currently up to each NVDIMM vendor whether or not to provide encryption..

     

    Could you explain the relationship between the NVDIMM and the IO stack?

    In the PMEM mode, the Kernel presents the NVDIMM as a reserved memory, directly accessible by the Host Memory Controller.

    In the Block Mode, the Kernel driver presents the NVDIMM as a block device to the IO Block Layer.
    With NVDIMMs the data can be in memory or storage. How is the data fragmentation managed?

    The NVDIMM-N is managed as regular memory. The same memory allocation fragmentation issues and handling apply. The NVDIMM-F behaves like an SSD. Fragmentation issues on an NVDIMM-F are handled like an SSD with garbage collection algorithms.

     

    Is there a plan to support PI type data protection for NVDIMM data? If not, achieving E2E data protection cannot be attained.

    As of today, encryption has not been standardized by JEDEC. It is currently up to each NVDIMM vendor whether or not to provide encryption.

     

    Since NVDIMM is still slower than DRAM so we still need DRAM in the system? We cannot get rid of DRAM yet?

    With NVDIMM-N DRAM is still being used. NVDIMM-N operates at the speed of standard RDIMM

    With NVDIMM-F modules, DRAM memory modules are still needed in the system.

    With NVDIMM-P modules, DRAM memory modules are still needed in the system.
    Can you use NVMe over ethernet?

    NVMe over Fabrics is under discussion within SNIA http://www.snia.org/sites/default/files/SDC15_presentations/networking/WaelNoureddine_Implementing_%20NVMe_revision.pdf

     


    SNIA’s Persistent Memory Education To Be Featured at Open Server Summit 2016

    April 12th, 2016

    sssi boothIf you are in Silicon Valley or the Bay Area this week, SNIA welcomes you to join them and the Solid State Storage Initiative April 13-14 at the Santa Clara Convention Center for Open Server Summit 2016, the industry’s premier event that focuses on the design of next- generation servers with topics on data center efficiency, SSDs, core OS, cloud server design, the future of open server and open storage, and other efforts toward combining industry-standard hardware with open-source software.

    The SNIA NVDIMM Special Interest Group is featured at OSS 2016, and will host a panel Thursday April 14 on NVDIMM technology, moderated by Bill Gervasi of JEDEC and featuring SIG members Diablo Technology, Netlist, and SMART Modular. The panel will highlight the latest activities in the three “flavors” of NVDIMM , and offer a perspective on the future of persistent memory in systems. Also, SNIA board member Rob Peglar of Micron Technology will deliver a keynote on April 14, discussing how new persistent memory directions create new approaches for system architects and enable entirely new applications involving enormous data sets and real-time analysis.

    SSSI will also be in booth 403 featuring demonstrations by the NVDIMM SIG, discussions on SSD data recovery and erase, and updates on solid state storage performance testing.  SNIA members and colleagues can register for $100 off using the code SNIA at http://www.openserversummit.com.


    Are Hard Drives or Flash Winning in Actual Density of Storage?

    March 9th, 2016

    The debate between hard drives and solid state drives goes on in 2016, particularly in the area of areal densities – the actual density of storage on a device.  Fortunately for us, Tom Coughlin, SNIA Solid State Storage Initiative Education Chair, and a respected analyst who contributes to Forbes, has advised that flash memory areal densities have exceeded those of hard drives since last year!

    Coughlin Associates provides several charts in the article which map lab demos and product HDD areal density since 2000, and contrasts that to new flash product announcements.  Coughlin comments that “Flash memory areal density exceeding HDD areal density is important since it means that flash memory products with higher capacity can be built using the same surface area.”

    Check out the entire article here.