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    SNIA Activities in Security, Containers, and File Storage on Tap at Three Bay Area Events

    February 14th, 2017

    SNIA will be out and about in February in San Francisco and Santa Clara, CA, focused on their security, container, and file storage activities.

    February 14-17 2017, join SNIA in San Francisco at the RSA Conference in the OASIS Interop: KMIP & PKCS11 booth S2115. OASIS and SNIA member companies will be demonstrating OASIS Key Management Interoperability Protocol (KMIP) through live interoperability across all participants. SNIA representatives will be on hand in the booth to answer questions about the Storage Security Industry Forum KMIP Conformance Test Program, which enables organizations with KMIP implementations to validate the protocol conformance of those products and meet market requirements for secure, plug-and-play storage solutions.… Continue reading


    We’ve Been Thinking…What Does Hyperconverged Mean to Storage?

    February 1st, 2017

    Here at the SNIA Ethernet Storage Forum (ESF), we’ve been discussing how hyperconverged adoption will impact storage. Converged Infrastructure (CI), Hyperconverged Infrastructure (HCI), along with Cluster or Cloud In a Box (CIB) are popular trend topics that have gained both industry and customer adoption. As part of data infrastructures, CI, HCI, and CIB enable simplified deployment of resources (servers, storage, I/O networking, hypervisor, application software) across different environments.

    But what do these approaches mean for the storage environment? What are the key concerns and considerations related specifically to storage? How will the storage be connected to (or included in) the platform? Who will protect and backup the data? And most importantly, how do you know that you’re asking the right questions in order to get to the right answers?

    Find out on March 15th in a live SNIA-ESF webcast, “What Does Hyperconverged Mean to Storage.” We’ve invited expert Greg Schulz, founder and analyst of Server StorageIO, to answer the questions we’ve been debating. Join us, as Greg will move beyond the hype (pun intended) to discuss:

    • What are the storage considerations for CI, CIB and HCI
    • Why fast applications and fast servers need fast I/O
    • Networking and server-storage I/O considerations
    • How to avoid aggravation-causing aggregation (bottlenecks)
    • Aggregated vs. disaggregated vs. hybrid converged
    • Planning, comparing, benchmarking and decision-making
    • Data protection, management and east-west I/O traffic
    • Application and server north-south I/O traffic

    Register today and please bring your questions. We’ll be on-hand to answer them during this event. We hope to see you there!


    Buffers, Queues, and Caches, Oh My!

    January 18th, 2017

    Buffers and Queues are part of every data center architecture, and a critical part of performance – both in improving it as well as hindering it. A well-implemented buffer can mean the difference between a finely run system and a confusing nightmare of troubleshooting. Knowing how buffers and queues work in storage can help make your storage system shine.

    However, there is something of a mystique surrounding these different data center components, as many people don’t realize just how they’re used and why. Join our team of carefully-selected experts on February 14th in the next live webcast in our “Too Proud to Ask” series, “Everything You Wanted to Know About Storage But Were Too Proud To Ask – Part Teal: The Buffering Pod” where we’ll demystify this very important aspect of data center storage. You’ll learn:

    • What are buffers, caches, and queues, and why you should care about the differences?
    • What’s the difference between a read cache and a write cache?
    • What does “queue depth” mean?
    • What’s a buffer, a ring buffer, and host memory buffer, and why does it matter?
    • What happens when things go wrong?

    These are just some of the topics we’ll be covering, and while it won’t be exhaustive look at buffers, caches and queues, you can be sure that you’ll get insight into this very important, and yet often overlooked, part of storage design.

    Register today and spend Valentine’s Day with our experts who will be on-hand to answer your questions on the spot!


    SNIA Puts the You in YouTube

    October 26th, 2016

    Did you know that SNIA has a YouTube Channel?  SNIAVideo is the place designed for You to visit for the latest technical and educational content – all free to download – from SNIA thought leaders and events. youtube channel

    Our latest videos cover a wide range of topics discussed at last month’s SNIA Storage Developer Conference.  Enjoy The Ride Cast video playlist where industry expert Marc Farley (@GoFarley) motors around Silicon Valley with SNIA member volunteers Richelle Ahlvers(@rahlvers), Stephen Bates (@stepbates), Mark Carlson(@macsun), and storage and solid state technology analysts Tom Coughlin (@ThomasaCoughlin), and Jim Handy chatting about persistent memory, SNIA Swordfish, NVMe, storage end users, and more. … Continue reading


    SNIA Storage Developer Conference-The Knowledge Continues

    October 13th, 2016

    SNIA’s 18th Storage Developer Conference is officially a success, with 124 general and breakout sessions;  Cloud Interoperability, Kinetiplugfest 5c Storage, and SMB3 plugfests; ten Birds-of-a-Feather Sessions, and amazing networking among 450+ attendees.  Sessions on NVMe over Fabrics won the title of most attended, but Persistent Memory, Object Storage, and Performance were right behind.  Many thanks to SDC 2016 Sponsors, who engaged attendees in exciting technology discussions.… Continue reading


    The Changing World of SNIA Technical Work – A Conversation with Technical Council Chair Mark Carlson

    August 3rd, 2016

    carlson_mark_resizeMark Carlson is the current Chair of the SNIA Technical Council (TC). Mark has been a SNIA member and volunteer for over 18 years, and also wears many other SNIA hats.   Recently, SNIA on Storage sat down with Mark to discuss his first nine months as the TC Chair and his views on the industry.

    SNIA on Storage (SoS):  Within SNIA, what is the most important activity of the SNIA Technical Council?Continue reading


    Podcasts Bring the Sounds of SNIA’s Storage Developer Conference to Your Car, Boat, Train, or Plane!

    May 26th, 2016

    SNIA’s Storage Developer Conference (SDC) offers exactly what a developer of cloud, solid state, security, analytics, or big data applications is looking  for – rich technical content delivered in a no-vendor bias manner by today’s leading technologists.  The 2016 SDC agenda is being compiled, but now yousdc podcast pic can get a “sound bite” of what to expect by downloading  SDC podcasts via iTunes, or visiting the SDC Podcast site at http://www.snia.org/podcasts to download the accompanying slides and/or listen to the MP3 version.… Continue reading


    Hitachi Data Systems’ Hu Yoshida Featured in Keynote at SNIA Annual Members Symposium

    January 18th, 2016

    The Storage Networking Industry Association (SNIA) Annual Members Symposium is a must attend event for both SNIA members and interested colleagues. Held at the Westin San Jose in San Jose California from January 19-22, 2016, the Symposium offers four full days of collaboration, networking, and knowledge about the latest advances in cloud storage, Ethernet storage, solid state storage, storage management, green computing, and more. Register and learn more at http://www.snia.org/events/symp.… Continue reading


    Outstanding Keynotes from Leading Storage Experts Make SDC Attendance a Must!

    September 18th, 2015

    Posted by Marty Foltyn

    Tomorrow is the last day to register online for next week’s Storage Developer Conference at the Hyatt Regency Santa Clara. What better incentive to click www.storagedeveloper.org and register than to read about the amazing keynote and featured speakers at this event – I think they’re the best since the event began in 1998! Preview sessions here, and click on the title to download the full description.… Continue reading


    What’s Happening with 25GbE

    August 25th, 2014

    In July 2014, IEEE 802.3 voted to form a Study Group for 25Gb/s Ethernet.  There has been a lot attention in the networking press lately about 25Gb/s Ethernet, but many people are asking what is it and how did we get here.  After all, 802.3 already has completed standards for 40Gb/s and 100Gb/s and is currently working on 400Gb/s, so from a pure speed perspective, starting a 25Gb/s project now does look like a step backwards.

    (Warning: the following discussion contains excessive physical layer jargon.)

    The Sweet Spot

    25GbE as a port speed is attractive because it makes use of 25Gb/s per lane signaling technology that has been in development for years in the industry, culminating in the recent completion of 802.3bj, the standard for 100GbE over backplane or TwinAx copper that utilizes four parallel lanes of 25Gb/s signaling to achieve the 100Gb/s port speed. Products implementing 25Gb/s signaling in CMOS technology are just starting to come to market, and the rate will likely be a sweet spot for many years, as higher rate signaling of 40Gb/s or 50Gb/s is still in early technology development phases. The ability to implement this high speed I/O in CMOS is important because it allows combining high-speed I/O with many millions of logic gates needed to implement Ethernet switches, controllers, FPGAs, and microprocessors. Thus specifying a MAC rate of 25Gb/s to utilize 25Gb/s serdes technology can enable product developers to optimize for both the lowest cost/bit and the highest overall bandwidth utilization of the switching fabric.

    4-Lane to 1-Lane Evolution

    To see how we got here and why 25Gb/s is interesting, it is useful to back up a couple of generations and look at 10Gb/s and 40Gb/s Ethernet.  Earliest implementations of 10GbE relied on rather wide parallel electrical interfaces: XGMII and the 16-Bit interface.  Very soon after, however, 4-lane serdes-based interfaces became the norm starting with XAUI (for chip-to-chip and chip-to-optical module use) which was then adapted to longer reaches on TwinAx and backplane (10GBASE-CX4 and 10GBASE-KX4).  Preceding 10GbE achieving higher volumes (~2009) was the specification and technical feasibility of 10Gb/s on a single electrical serial lane. XFI was the first followed by 10GBASE-KR (backplane) and SFI (as an optical module interface and for direct attach TwinAx cable using the SFP+ pluggable form factor).  KR and SFI started to ramp around 2009 and are still the highest volume share of 10GbE ports in datacenter applications. The takeaway, in my opinion, is that single-lane interfaces helped the 10GbE volume ramp by reducing interconnect cost. Now look forward to 40GbE and 10GbE. The initial standard, 802.3ba, was completed in 2010.  So during the time that this specification was being developed, 10Gb/s serial interfaces were gaining traction, and consensus formed around the use of multiple 10Gb/s lanes in parallel to make the 40GbE and 100GbE electrical interfaces. For example, there is a great similarity between 10GBASE-KR, and one lane of the 40GBASE-KR4 four-lane interface. In a similar fashion 10Gb/s SFI for TwinAx  & optics in the SFP+ form factor is similar to a lane of the 40GbE equivalent interfaces for TwinAx and optics in the QSFP+ form factor.

    But how does this get to 25Gb/s?

    Due to the similarity in technology needed to make 10GbE and 40GbE, it has because a common feature in Ethernet switch and NIC chips to implement a four-lane port for 40GbE that can be configured to use each lane separately yielding four 10GbE ports.

    From there it is a natural extension that 100GbE ports being implemented using 802.3bj technology (4x25Gb/s) also can be configured to support four independent ports operating at 25Gb/s.  This is such a natural conclusion that multiple companies are implementing 25GbE even though it is not a standard.

    In some environments, the existence of a standard is not a priority.  For example, when a large-scale datacenter of compute, storage and networking is architected, owned and operated by one entity, that entity validates the necessary configuration to meet its requirements. For the broader market, however, there is typically a requirement for multi-vendor interoperability across a diverse set of configurations and uses. This is where Ethernet and IEEE 802.3 has provided value to the industry for over 30 years.

    Where’s the Application?

    Given the nature of their environment, it is the Cloud datacenter operators that are poised to be the early adopters of 25GbE. Will it also find a home in more traditional enterprise and storage markets? Time will tell, but in many environments ease of use, long shelf life, and multi-vendor interoperability are the priorities. For any environment, having the 25GbE specification maintained IEEE 802.3 will facilitate those needs.